Increase Local Reasoning with Stateless Architecture and Value Types

It is just another Thursday of adding features to your mobile app.

You have blasted through your task list by extending the current underlying object model + data retrieval code.

Your front-end native views are all coming together. The navigation between views and specific data loading is all good.

Git Commit. Git Push. The build pops out on HockeyApp. The Friday sprint review goes well. During the sprint review the product manager points out that full CRUD (Create, Read, Update, Delete) functionality is required in each of the added views. You only have the ‘R’ in ‘CRUD’ implemented. You look through your views, think it just can’t be that bad to add C, U and D, and commit to adding full CRUD to all the views by next Friday’s sprint review.

The weekend passes by, you come in on Monday and start going through all your views to add full CRUD. You update your first view with full CRUD; start navigating through your app; do some creates, updates, and deletes; and notice that all of those other views you added last week are just broken. Whole swaths of classes are sharing data you didn’t know was shared between them. Mutation to data in one view has unknown effects on the other views due to the shared references to data classes from your back-end object model.

Your commitment to having this all done by Friday is looking like a pipe-dream.

[Read more…]

Practical Data Cleaning Using Stanford Named Entity Recognizer

I enjoy learning about all of the events in and around World War II, especially the Pacific theater.

I was reading the book Miracle at Midway  by Gordon W. Prange (et. al.) and started to get curious about the pre- and post- histories of all the naval vessels involved in the Battle of Midway.

Historically, so many people, plans, and materials had to merge together at a precise moment in time in order for the Battle of Midway to be fought where it was and realize its radical impact on the outcome of World War II.

I got curious as to the pre- and post-history of all the people and ships that fought at Midway and wanted a way to visualize all of that history in a mobile application.

[Read more…]

Writing Node Applications as a .NET Developer – My experience in Developing in Node vs .NET/C# (Part 3)

While the previous posts described what one needs to know prior to starting a Node project, what follows is some of my experiences that I came across while writing a Node application.  

How do I structure my project?

The main problem I had when developing my Node application was figuring out a sound application structure. As mentioned earlier, there is a significant difference between Node and C# when it comes to declaring file dependencies. C#’s using statement is more of a convenience feature for specifying namespaces and its compiler does the dirty work of determining what files and DLLs are required to compile a program. Node’s CommonJS module system explicitly imports a file or dependency into a dependent file at runtime. In C#, I generally inject a class’s dependencies via constructor injection, delegating object instantiation and resolution to an Inversion of Control container. In Javascript, however, I tend to write in a more functional manner where I write and pass around functions instead of stateful objects.

[Read more…]

Coping with Device Rotation in Xamarin.Android

You think that you have your Android application in a state where you can demo it to your supervisor when you accidentally rotate your device and the app crashes. We have all been there before and the good news is that the fix is usually pretty simple even if it can sometimes take awhile to find.

This has always been an issue for Android developers, but I have found that, due to the unique interaction between your C# classes and the corresponding Java objects, it seems to be a little more sensitive with Xamarin.Android apps. In this post, we will discuss what happens when you rotate your device and cover the different techniques that you might choose to use to manage your application state through device rotations as well as the ramifications of each of them.

[Read more…]

Writing Node Applications as a .NET Developer – Getting Ready to Develop (Part 2)

In the previous blog post, I provided a general overview of some the key differences between the two frameworks. With this out of the way we’re ready to get started writing an application. However, there are some key decisions to make regarding what development tools to use as well as getting the execution environment set up.

Selecting an IDE/Text Editor

Before I could write a line of code, I needed to decide on an IDE/Text Editor that I wanted to use to write my application. As a C# developer, I was spoiled with the number of features that Visual Studio offered a developer that allowed for a frictionless and productive developing experience. I wanted to have this same experience when writing a Node application so before deciding on an IDE, I had a few prerequisites:

  • Debugging capabilities built into the IDE
  • Unobtrusive and generally correct autocomplete
  • File navigation via symbols (CTRL + click in Visual Studio with Resharper extension)
  • Refactoring utilities that I could trust; Find/Replace wasn’t good enough

[Read more…]

Writing Node Applications as a .NET Developer

As a .NET developer, creating modern web apps using Node on the backend can seem daunting.  The amount of tooling and setup required before you can write a “modern” application has resulted in the development community to display “Javascript Fatigue”; a general wariness related to the exploding amount of tooling, libraries, frameworks and best practices that are introduced on a seemingly daily basis.  Contrast this with building an app in .NET using Visual Studio where the developer simply selects a project template to build off of and they’re ready to go. [Read more…]

Universal Windows Platform – The Undiscovered Country for Windows Desktop Apps

It is unfortunate, but I think Dr. McCoy from Star Trek: The Original Series said it best: ‘Windows 10 Mobile is dead, Jim“…. and just to pile on with one more.

Buried underneath the red shirt like death of Windows 10 Mobile lies the amazing Universal Windows Platform (UWP).

The developer capabilities of the Universal Windows Platform have been documented in many a location.

UWP provides:

  • Full developer parity at the API and framework level across all flavors of Windows 10, Xbox One, HoloLens, and Windows 10 Mobile devices.
  • A simplified install model via APPX bundles.
  • A per-app separation of registry and file systems.
  • XAML controls ‘just work’ across all Windows 10 / UWP devices.
  • Targeting the UWP API set ensures that your app works across Windows 10 / UWP devices.

In my experience, there is nothing weirder than seeing your Windows 10 / UWP app just work on an Xbox One,  in a virtual projected rectangle via a HoloLens, and via mouse and keyboard on a standard Windows 10 PC.

[Read more…]

Mobile App Services

Starting on a mobile app can be a daunting proposition.

Your stakeholders at Rex’s Gym really need this app to help drive customer retention, promote the business, and make payments a breeze.

Getting the development environment set up, learning a new language, understanding a wholly different API for screen layouts per-platform, having to go to the Apple Store and buy a Mac (which is the absolutely last thing you thought you would ever do).

[Read more…]

Apple WWDC – The Worth of Being There

In this era of travel budget crackdowns and higher than normal oversight into technology budgets, the iOS software engineer can get lost in the shuffle when it comes to training time and opportunities to talk with other members of the iOS development community.

Due to the rise of the popularity of Apple’s iOS platform, Apple WWDC (Worldwide Developer Conference) has become the central rallying point for iOS developers. It seems that the entire iOS community gathers in San Francisco over the week of WWDC. Many developers go to San Francisco over the week of WWDC even if they don’t have a ticket to the conference.

[Read more…]

C# vs. Swift – Iron Man vs. Captain America

In Captain America: Civil War we get to see the ultimate battle between Iron Man and Captain America.

It is a battle of simple gutty defense vs. smart weapons and flashy offense, humility vs. brashness, down in the dirt vs. up in the clouds.

To totally geek it up, the same kind of battle exists in the languages that software engineers use today and I believe this is especially true in the battle of C# vs. Swift.

Don’t worry, this really isn’t a versus type write up. If anything I seek to point out each language’s unique strengths, then show how software engineers can get into the right superhero mindset to really use those strengths, and be aware of the weaknesses, to create great solutions.

[Read more…]